I Hate Computer Science (Is There a Role For Me? + Alternative Options)

I Hate Computer Science

Computer science is a popular major today, but its popularity does not mean it is the right path for everyone. You may have started your studies in the field only to realize that you do not really like it, and you are probably figuring what to do next.  

Once you finally say, “I hate computer science,” you will need to figure out what to do to remedy your situation. You came to the right place if you are in this predicament and looking for solutions to this problem.

4 Reasons That Could Make You Hate Computer Science

You may hate studying computer science for one or multiple reasons. The commons reasons most students find themselves hating computer science include the following:

1. Coding

While there is much more to computer science than just coding, it is a huge part of studying and practicing computer science. Some students may dislike everything about coding, from the practical to the theoretical part, while others hate one part of it. Computer science students often have to focus on the theoretical aspects of programming languages which can be pretty dull.

Spending hours and even days tackling mathematical theories can lead you to dislike computer science. You may also find tweaking codes to complete your projects or assignments quite annoying. Pursuing a career in computer science may not be the right path for you if you do not like coding.

2. Time-Consuming

You will need to spend over 10 hours every week studying as a computer science student. You will have to factor in the program courses you are taking, assignments, projects, and everything else in your life. Time is one of the reasons computer science is regarded as a demanding major.

Even students who are really good at computer science will have to spend a lot of time on schoolwork. You can consider a different career path if time is the reason you hate computer science. Luckily, there are numerous options.

3. Many Courses

You will need to complete a lot of courses during your studies in computer science before graduating. These include artificial intelligence, data logic, algorithm, calculus, machine learning, statistics, electronic design, and computer theory, among many more.

Some of the courses may not matter in your career but purely serve the purpose of attaining a passing grade. This realization of this fact and the sheer work you will put into passing them may cause you to hate computer science.

4. The Course is Logic-Oriented

Working with computers requires you to think logically; reduce things to a language the computer can understand, which can be pretty exhausting. Pure logic can deter people from computer science, especially if you enjoy using your creativity to solve problems.

Is There A Role For You In Computer Science If You Hate It?

Computer science is a broad field that entails studying and dealing with computational systems and computers. Therefore, disliking certain aspects of computer science does not necessarily mean you cannot find a role that will fit your preferences and goals in the field.

For instance, you can pursue some areas of computer science that require minimal or no programming if you do not like coding. These include game testing, technical writing, technology journalism, graphic designing, technical recruitment, SEO specialist, and project management.

Since STEM courses are largely involved in computer science, you can look into science-related careers you may enjoy. In addition, engineering programs are an excellent choice.

What To Do If You Do Not Like Computer Science

How far along into your computer science course is a huge consideration when considering what to do once you find out you do not like the major. For instance, it would be easy to abandon the course if you are in your first semester than you would if you were three years into your studies.

In addition, you must consider what motivated you to pursue computer science and what it would mean for you to complete your studies. Some motivations for pursuing certain careers include family influence and job prospects.

Below are some options you can take if you discover you dislike computer science after starting the course.

1. Go Into A Different Major

Check if you can transition from computer science to a major you like. Find ways to do this in a cost-effective and timely manner. Although computer science deals a lot with STEM subjects, that should not compel you to pursue a STEM-related course if you are not interested.

If you have an advisor, talk to them. They will be in a better position to give you relevant advice and even help you find a career path you enjoy like software engineering. For instance, they could help you do a double major that will help you complete your degree and open new and exciting prospects for you.

2. Complete Your Degree Course 

You can decide to continue studying computer science and earn your degree even if you don’t like it. You can choose this path if you are close to completing, cannot afford to switch, think you have the will to finish, or something else is motivating you. The best part is you do not have to go into a computer science-related career after school if you do not want.

3. Drop Out

You can still have a fulfilling career without a degree. So, you can drop out and find a different career path if computer science and college are not for you.

Alternatives To Computer Science You Can Pursue

If you decide to change your major from computer science, you must find a different course that will work best for you professionally and personally. Transitioning into a STEM major may be easier, considering computer science entails many STEM subjects. Some STEM majors you could pursue are:

Also, non-STEM courses like project management, marketing, and finance could be the right fit.

Conclusion

Discovering that you do not like computer science can be disheartening, especially after putting in the work, time, and finances into it. However, it is better to find out early than halfway into your career. I hope this post offers the guidance you need to choose the right move once you realize you don’t like computer science.

Tom

Tom is a network engineer and a tech consultant. He spends his time solving networking problems while keeping tabs with the latest in the technology field.

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